Volunteering With Animals – Part Six: Veterinary Clinic Volunteers

When I started trying to break into veterinary nursing a lot of people told me volunteering in a clinic is a great way to get experience and improve your chances of landing a job. However, when I asked around and local clinics none of them were interested in taking on volunteers. So how do you land a volunteer role in a vet clinic?

It doesn’t hurt to ask anyway, and you never know if your local clinic is different to the ones I approached. If you know someone already in the industry then ask if the clinic they work at would be willing to let you volunteer a few hours a week. It’s not uncommon for the kids of vets to help out around the clinic, so having the right contact who can vouch for you might be a way in.

Otherwise some of the not-for-profit animal hospitals do take on volunteers in their clinics. Around Melbourne these include the RSPCA and Animal Aid. Volunteer roles in the clinic are very popular, so you may be added to a waiting list. It’s highly recommended that you take on shifts as an animal attendant or dog walker in the meantime.

I’ve only done a couple of volunteer shifts in veterinary clinic, so I can’t be sure that they’re all the same. You can expect to be cleaning and resetting enclosures, restocking supplies, helping with feeding routines and doing lots and lots of laundry. You might take dogs out for toilet walks or spend time with patients while they’re in recovery. Animals that are sick or recovering for surgery usually need to be kept quiet and inactive, so these kinds of positions may not involve all that much animal handling. What they do offer is the opportunity to see the inner workings of a veterinary clinic and what vets and nurses do day-to-day. It also offers great networking opportunities – introducing you to industry professionals and giving you priority consideration if they start looking for new employees at the clinic. This kind of role is great for people wishing to work in a vet clinic, but if you’re in it for the cuddles I would look at other ways of volunteering.

A lot of the patients you might deal with at a shelter clinic will be surrendered animals undergoing routine desexing surgeries. However, you may also be faced with animals that are recovering from severe neglect, cruelty or disease. Since you will only be there for a few hours a week, and most patients are not in the hospital for more than a day or two, you won’t find out the outcomes of every patient – but, not all of them will make it. These are things to keep in mind when considering a role in a vet clinic.

All-in-all volunteering in a vet clinic is a great way to give back, and to gain experience and contacts in this rewarding field!

Have you ever volunteered at a clinic? If you know of other clinics that take volunteers I’d love to hear about them!

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The Tawny Frogmouth

Yesterday a kind stranger noticed a small Tawny Frogmouth on the ground and brought it into the vet clinic I’m working at to be checked.

side view Tawny

In true confusing Australian wildlife style, the Tawny Frogmouth is often mistaken for an owl because of its boxy body, wide eyes and nocturnal nature. But just as Koalas are not bears, Frogmouths are not owls.

No obvious injuries were found, however, it was very skinny and being awake in the daytime is very odd for this nocturnal species.

Top view Tawny

While waiting for the wildlife carer we gave the little guy some water, and put in a cat carrier covered with a towel in a quiet area of the clinic.

The vets decided it was best to contact the local Wildlife Victoria volunteer foster carer, who came to collect the Frogmouth in less than an hour of being contacted. She will care for the Frogmouth until it puts on some weight and is well enough to return to the wild.

 

Volunteering With Animals – Part Four: Wildlife Foster Carers

Photo via AWARE Wildlife RescueWildlife caring is both more involved, and less involved than caring for companion animals. All wildlife carers and shelters in Victoria must be licensed by the Department of Environment and Primary Industries (DEPI) and undergo training in wildlife care to comply with the Code of Practice for the Welfare of Wildlife During Rehabilitation. Some shelters and groups receive grants or donations, but the cost of transport, equipment, medication and food required are usually paid for out of the carers pocket.  Baby animals may need feeding around the clock and sick or injured animals may need to stay in care for quite some time, so you can expect the role to be both time-consuming and expensive.

However, independence and an instinctual fear of humans and domestic animals is essential for the survival of native animals, so carers are encouraged to handle them as little as possible. They must be kept apart from all pets, children and noises of the home, remain on the designated property except for visiting the vet and being released, and not be handled by friends or guests. The work of a carer includes providing shelter, water and food for the animal, cleaning their enclosures and may include administering medications.

Possum eyesA “shelter” consists of carers with the experience and equipment to provide care of wildlife with minimal support from others (except for a veterinarian for medical issues). Some shelters are larger groups or organisations, but individuals can also register as a ‘shelter’ once they have the training and experience to care for wildlife independently. To start caring for wildlife you must become a carer for a shelter. The shelter will provide training and support either in a group or via one-on-one mentoring. Once you have started this training you can register with the DEPI as a carer for the shelter.

I hate to turn people off this kind of volunteering – but the sad truth of it must be mentioned. Not all of these animals can be saved, and euthanasia is sometimes the only option. Animals must be 100% fit to survive in the wild, so if a full recovery cannot be made they must be euthanised. You may theorize that severely injured animals could be adopted and live out their lives as pets, but for wild animals this is an extremely stressful experience and a very poor quality of life. All wildlife must be released close to where they were originally found, which increases their chances of reclaiming their territory and finding appropriate food, reduces the spread of disease, stops unnatural interbreeding and stops introduced animals from threatening other wildlife of an area. If they cannot be released where they were found they are legally required to be humanely destroyed.

Although the work is costly, demanding and sometimes comes with heartbreak, watching an animal grow, recover and return to thrive in its natural environment can be immensely rewarding to foster carers. The most common animals requiring carers in Victoria are possums, magpies, ducks and Eastern Grey Kangaroos, and the kinds of animals you are asked to care for will largely depend on your experience and facilities. I found this adorable video by Wildlife Victoria which will hopefully inspire you to help despite the challenges:

There ‘s heaps of great information on becoming a wildlife carer, but the first step is to get in touch with a shelter operator in your area. The Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife’s website has a great list of shelters across Australia to get you started.
Do you have any heartwarming stories of rescued wildlife? I’d love yo hear them in the comments section!

A Post About Poo!

I have exciting poo news!

You know you were meant to be a veterinary nurse when you can get this excited about cat poo. I won’t be offended if you decide this post stinks (see what I did there?) and don’t read any further…

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Studying pet nutrition and working with vets has taught me that there can be heaps of benefits to feeding pets premium foods. Lowered risk of health issues, a longer average lifespan, smaller meals required and smaller, less smelly droppings. The manufactures have done countless studies to support this, and most veterinarians will recommend a premium pet food over other options.

But still, I wanted to see for myself. When Aztec the Russian Blue arrived as a house guest she had been fed supermarket foods. What a perfect opportunity to do a food trial, and see whether I noticed any difference to her health.

For the first few weeks of her stay I fed her the rest of the food she came with. She would get dry food in the morning (which would last her through the day), and then half a sashe of wet food in the evening. A fussy kitty, she likes the fish flavoured foods.

When she poo’d, boy did we know it! The smell would wonder into the lounge room faster Aztec could! This was the only upside to being between jobs: I could clean it up quickly before the stink seeped through the appartment.

Once the food was running low I ducked down to the pet supply store to pick out a premium food to trail. Out of work, I still wanted to go with the cheapest option. Most of the premium foods have an approximation of how many days of food are in each bag, so you can calculate the cost. Generally pets will need to eat less of a premium food than a supermarket food, and it can work out to be only a little bit more expensive or even cheaper. I chose Advance food because it seemed to be the cheapest option.

Cats and Dogs aged 7 years or older should be on a senior food.

Advance Mature Cat food was the cheapest, most appropriate premium food for 15 year old Aztec.

I transitioned the dry food first, because I still has quite a bit of wet saches left. Over the course of a few days I increased the percentage of Advance food I was feeding, so as not to upset her tummy with a sudden change. By this stage I didn’t really notice any difference in Aztecs behaviour, stools or body condition.

Finally the supermarket wet food ran out, and she was only eating Advance food. Two days later I found a poo in her tray. Aztec hadn’t got up from her spot in the lounge room for some time. It must have been there an hour, and we hadn’t smelled it! What a difference after only two days without supermarket food!

Sadly I couldn't find an Advance wet food in a mature variety, or with a fish-only flavour. Since I'm only feeding Aztec about a table spoon (1 third of a can) each day, and the dry food is her primary diet I decided it was ok to go with a non-mature food.

Sadly I couldn’t find an Advance wet food in a mature variety, or with a fish-only flavour. Since I’m only feeding Aztec about a table spoon (1 third of a can) each day, and the dry food is her primary diet I decided it was ok to go with a non-mature food.

Over the last few weeks since then I’ve noticed further improvements. Her poos are smaller, firmer (not too firm) and a healthier brown than the somewhat yellowy colour they were before. I haven’t noticed any changes to her behaviour or body condition but those were good to begin with.

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I must say she doesn’t like the wet food as much as the super market brand. It might be because it isn’t enough of a fishy flavour for her, or perhaps she doesn’t like the loaf style texture, but she doesn’t get excited and wolf it down like the other stuff.

Even if it weren’t for the other health benefits, I recommend switching to a premium food for the sake of your pets poo cleaner-upper!

What I learned this week: Job Trial

This week my online courses have taken a back seat because I’ve spent 3 days completing a job trial at a vet clinic on Melbourne’s eastern suburbs. Of course, this means I’ve been learning a LOT!

Every practice and workplace functions a little differently, so even if you’re starting in a role almost identical to one you’ve held previously you need to expect a steep learning curve to begin with. Everything will be kept in a different place, your boss will have a different preference for how things are done and you’ll have a whole new workplace culture to navigate.

This clinic uses the patient management software RxWorks, which I think is one of the most commonly used in Australian veterinary practices. I was excited to have the opportunity to have it explained and give it a crack, since I’m likely to use in my work even if I’m not offered this job. 

It’s hideous; a stark white spreadsheet with blocks of flurescent blue, green, navy and maroon to indicate different kinds of appointments. It might get hard on the eyes looking at this for too long every day.

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Would you believe the version they’re using at this clinic is even uglier than this image? I’m not sure if they got to choose their own colour palette, but who ever decided fluro and poo brown go together was seriously mistaken.

But I’ve found I’ve picked up the basics of the software pretty quickly. It’s not entirely different from AlisVet, which I used at the last practice I worked at (AlisVet is somewhat less ugly). Apparently there is a training version of RxWorks, so I’ll hopefully get a chance to have a play with that. 

Another new thing they’ve been teaching me is monitoring anaesthetic during surgery. Like many of the nursing things, I’m actually finding it less complex and daunting than I would have expected. 

I’ve never had surgery myself, and to be honest I’ve always been a little terrified of surgery in general, and of anaesthesia specifically. Learning about anaesthetic has made me a bit more comfortable with the safely of it all. If I can monitor it, then it’s probably pretty safe for humans who have a highly educated anaesthetist looking out for us.